Wednesday, February 10, 2021

COMING FEBRUARY 28TH from ST ROOSTER BOOKS; 3 HITS FROM THE HOLLER by PAUL LUBACZEWSKI

St Rooster Books is proud to present our second partnership with author Paul Lubaczewski, following last year's Basketball Diaries meets Clive Barker novella, A New Life. This month's release is a collection of three novellas of Appalachian horror called 3 Hits from the Holler and Paul continues to kick our ass with his brilliant heartfelt and intelligent narratives. Steph Murr did another amazing cover, that perfectly compliments the stories within. The book will be available in paperback and on the Kindle and you can order through your local book shops or online on February 28th. 



Before deciding to take writing seriously Paul had done many things, printer, caving, the SCA, Brew-master, punk singer, music critic etc. Since then he has appeared in numerous science fiction, and horror magazines and anthologies. Born in Philadelphia Pennsylvania, he moved to Appalachia in his 30s for the peace and adventure found there. He has three children, two who live in his native Pennsylvania, and one interrupting his writing constantly at home. Married to his lovely wife Leslie for twenty years, they live in a fairy tale town in nestled in a valley by a river. Author of over 50 published stories, his debut novel “I Never Eat…Cheesesteak” came out in2019, and his
A New Life and Cult of the Gator God both dropped in 2020.

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

OPEN SUBMISSION CALL! ST ROOSTER BOOKS is PUBLISHING an ANTHOLOGY of SEA HORROR!

 WHAT WE'RE LOOKING FOR; Horror stories set in or around the ocean (fishing villages, coastal town, an island, etc-so long as the central action heavily figures in the ocean). I'm not saying NO to Lovecraftian horror, partly because its hard to escape Lovecraft's influence over aquatic horror, but there are numerous Lovecraftian anthologies out there, so dig deep if you involve the Deep Ones, Cthulhu, etc. What I will say no to is anything racist, sexist, homophobic, or transphobic. Splatterpunk and extreme horror are welcome, but I draw the line at rape-centric/rape revenge stories written by men. That's always been a personal line for me. Give me gothic period pieces, blood and guts, shark attacks, ghosts, modern tales of madness, weird sci-fi horror, dystopia...Go nuts! And spread the word, I'd love to get a lot more submissions from women, people of color, and LGBTQ+ community. 

WORD COUNT; 3-5k words.

PAY; Flat $20

DEADLINE; May 1st.

SEND TO; tim-murr@live.com 



Wednesday, January 20, 2021

STRANGER WITH FRICTION IS NOW A PHYSICAL MAGAZINE AND ISSUE ONE IS OUT NOW!


"Published four times a year, Stranger With Friction is a magazine that reaches outside of St Rooster Books’ publishing orbit to artists, writers and musicians who we admire and/or are inspired by. It encompasses outsider literature, punk rock, and horror movies which have informed St Rooster Books’ mission statement from the start. Featuring essays and reviews, interviews, fiction and poetry, and artwork, Stranger With Friction is printed as an oversized, perfect bound book-zine through a print-on-demand service and available to e-readers. St Rooster Books seeks to create a unique reading experience by mixing an eclectic group of writers and artists in an entertaining and collectible riot of a combination of Slash Magazine, Rue Morgue, and the Evergreen Review."

Get your copy HERE.

Issue One features; editor/BORN IN THE WINTER

WAXWORK RECORDS’ TOP FIVE RELEASES BY MARK PIDGEON

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT/AN INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR IZZY LEE

fiction/WHAT IS LEFT BY PAUL LUBACZEWSKI

MUSIC IN HORROR: RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD BY CHRIS CAVORETTO

fiction/CRAMPS BY LAMONT A TURNER

TEXAS IS THE REASON: LOOKING BACK AT THE TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE

AMERICAN JESUS 2020 BY ERIK STEWART

fiction/NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH BY CARTER JOHNSON

NOW LET US PRAISE NOISE; CLASSIC LURCHING DEATH OF 1984

poetry/ERIK STEWART

PUBLISHER SPOTLIGHT: WEIRDPUNK BOOKS

MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN MONSTERS: CABAL and NIGHTBREED

fiction/MACHO INSECURITY BY JEREMY LOWE

poetry/MARCELLINE BLOCK

Thursday, November 26, 2020

RIP Daria Nicolodi


This Thanksgiving we bid a sad farewell to one of Italy's great cinematic icons, Daria Nicolodi, actress and writer, and mother to Asia Argento. She wrote the screenplay for her ex-husband's (Dario Argento) film, Suspiria, while going uncredited for the story behind Inferno. She also went uncredited for Luigi Cozzi's 1989 The Black Cat, but was credited for the screenplay to his Paganini Horror. She was primarily known for acting though, appearing in Argento's Deep Red, Phenomena, Tenebre, Opera, and Mother of Tears, as well as Mario Bava's final film, Shock. She had many other film and TV roles through the years and even appeared in Asia's directorial debut Scarlet Diva


In every role she was magnetic and charming, not to mention lovely. She especially shone bright in Deep Red, where she was funny and fearless, stealing scenes from her co-star David Hemmings. And she certainly had one of the most memorable death scenes in Opera, where the killer put a gun to a peep hole and shot her through the eye. 


She leaves this world at the age 70. Our condolences to her friends and family.



Wednesday, November 25, 2020

STRANGER WITH FRICTION MAGAZINE COMING MID-JANUARY 2021

Some of you that follow me on social media already know this, but Stranger With Friction is becoming a physical magazine, debuting in about two months from today. I've had a soft open call for the first issue, testing the waters and reaching out to people I often collaborate with and that open call is now closed, but I am looking for new fiction for issue two, which will come out in late April/early May. In addition, I'll be looking for some non-fiction articles on horror movies, punk rock, and outsider literature. Specific details are at the bottom of the page.

When I launched this blog, I only had the vaguest idea of what I wanted to do or how to do it. I was struggling to finish two novels, and all my early efforts at starting an indie publishing house had crashed and burned. I started writing Stranger With Friction at the recommendation of my late friend Jase, who thought it was the very thing I needed to get my writing back on track. I didn't even know what a blog was, but he helped me start my old writing blog, The Path of Most Resistance, but I was always so damn precious with it, it was never any fun and often very forced. Stranger With Friction was supposed to be more fun, but it was also supposed to supplement a physical magazine that would focus on horror, comics, and punk rock, but the magazine never materialized and I became really focused on Stranger for years, building it into a recognizable name, where bands and directors would reach out to me for coverage. My posts started pretty shaky, but I regained my footing and banged out the novels, launching a new publishing imprint, and Stranger helped me get writing gigs with Popshifter, Biff Bam Pop, and Diabolique Magazine. Also, in the mean time, St Rooster Books got bigger, I started publishing anthologies, and this year released two novellas from other writers. I've been so busy the last three years that Stranger has fallen by the way-side, despite my efforts to periodically return to it with either a filmography series, guest posts, the odd "My Heroes Have Always Been Monsters," or the Hardcore Wednesday posts. 

Finally launching a magazine brings us full circle and it feels really good. I'll always prefer physical media, because there's just something about holding an actual book, magazine, newspaper, or comic book in in your hands. Its special, it feels magic. I love the tactile connection to the art. My hope is that the magazine far surpasses the blog at its best moments. It will encompass horror and outsider fiction, deep dives into film franchises and band discographies, feature interviews with writers, directors, artists, and publishers, and will hopefully introduce you to new voices in the arts. 

Thank you to everyone who continues to come back here. The blog isn't going away and will be getting more frequent updates, to finally be that supplement to a physical magazine and keep you up to date on new releases from St Rooster Books.

The first issue of Stranger With Friction will feature all new fiction and poetry, articles by Chris Cavoretto of Werewolves in Siberia and Mark Pidgeon, an interview with director Izzy Lee, a huge article on the Texas Chainsaw Massacre franchise, a profile on publisher Weirdpunk Books, the return of my old Let Us Now Praise Noise column, an all new My Heroes Have Always Been Monsters, and more! If you want to be included in issue two, read out mission statement below the banner for details.

Stranger With Friction; a Magazine of Punk, Literature, and Horror Published quarterly by St Rooster Books.

Published four times a year, Stranger With Friction is a magazine that reaches outside of St Rooster Books’ publishing orbit to artists, writers and musicians who we admire and/or are inspired by. It encompasses outsider literature, punk rock, and horror movies which have informed St Rooster Books’ mission statement from the start. Featuring essays and reviews, interviews, fiction and poetry, and artwork, Stranger With Friction is printed as an oversized, perfect bound book-zine through a print-on-demand service and available to e-readers. St Rooster Books seeks to create a unique reading experience by mixing an eclectic group of writers and artists in an entertaining and collectible riot of a combination of Slash Magazine, Juxtapoz, Rue Morgue, and the Evergreen Review.

Submissions; Works of fiction should be 2k-5k words and pay is a flat $10 plus contributor copy.

Works of non-fiction (articles, essays, reviews) should be a minimum of 1k and pay is worked out with the individual writer, depending on the length of work, max pay is about $10-$15 plus contributor copy.

Send submissions to Tim-murr@live.com

If you want to advertise, full page ads are $25 and should be sent as an 8x10 B&W jpeg. Contact me by email at Tim-murr@live.com for Paypal info.



 


   

Monday, November 2, 2020

Now Available; THE BLIND DEAD RIDE OUT OF HELL; A Literary Tribute the Films of Amando de Ossorio


In the early to mid 1970s, Spanish director Amando de Ossorio created a quadrology of films involving the resurrected eyeless corpses of Templar Knights aka THE BLIND DEAD. These films may have suffered from low budgets, but more than made up for it with creepy atmosphere and iconic creatures that have retained their ability to strike terror in the hearts of horror fans nearly five decades on. St Rooster Books is proud to present this literary tribute to Ossorio's beloved creations. Featuring new original stories by Paul Lubaczewski, Sam Richard, Heather Drain, Mark Zirbel, Jeremy Lowe, and Tim Murr, with an introduction by Diabolique Magazine's Jerome Reuter.

Get your copy HERE for just $9.99

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

HARDCORE WEDNESDAY; CIRCLE JERKS's GROUP SEX/WILD IN THE STREETS

As some of you know, I wrote a book about my favorite band, Thirsty and Miserable; A Critical Analysis of the Music of Black Flag. Some have poked fun at that title as a little much, but it's supposed to be a little much. That book is the whole reason I started Hardcore Wednesday, because I had to resist multiple digressions into talking about other bands, because I was bound and determined to stay focused on just the album or albums each chapter was specifically about. So, I came out the other side of that book wanting to talk about a shit load of other bands and albums. This is where Thirsty and Miserable and Hardcore Wednesday come together.
Black Flag's debut "Nervous Breakdown" EP  (1978) was a mere four songs, about five minutes total and it changed punk rock. "Nervous Breakdown," "Fix Me," "I've Had It," and "Wasted," were short, fast, brash, kinda funny, but also heart wrenchingly sincere. It captured lightning in a bottle and, though, Black Flag would go on to get better and better with each release (fight me, dude, I don't care what some old scenester thinks about Henry Rollins or My War, haha) within the world of punk Black Flag changed things.
And then the singer left. Keith Morris was/is an explosive front man, brimming with energy and charisma. He's one of punk's great lyricists and recognizable and beloved figures. To this day you'll find people who say "Nervous Breakdown" is Black Flag's best albums. Cool, that's an opinion I can respect for sure. It was less than a year from the release of "Nervous Breakdown" that Morris left (highly recommended-go read his autobiography My Damage. Essential book) and formed The Circle Jerks with Redd Kross (and future ex-Bad Religion) guitarist Greg Hetson. The original rhythm section was Roger Rogerson on bass and Lucky Lehrer on drums, but that would change frequently through the years with a number of legendary names like Zander Schloss, Earl Liberty, Flea, Chuck Biscuits, and Charlie Quintana coming and going.
Morris took his songs he'd written during his Black Flag years to make up parts of their 1980 debut album on Frontier Records, Group Sex, which featured an iconic colored shot of a black and white pic of a Circle Jerk audience, taken by the amazing Ed Colver, who also shot the iconic cover of Black Flag's Damaged. Two notable inclusions was a version of Flag's "Wasted" and "I Don't Care" (which later appeared on Everything Went Black) that pissed off Flag guitarist/founder Greg Ginn, but what could he do other than respond with a re-write of "I Don't Care" as "You Bet We've Got Something Personal Against You," sung by bassist Chuck Dukowski on the "Jealous Again" EP (which is my second least favorite Flag song, right behind "Rat's Eyes"). "Red Tape" and "Behind the Door" were also originally Flag songs, the latter surfaced on Damaged as "Room 13."
Group Sex had a lot more going for it than just old Flag songs though. Ripping out of the gates with "Deny Everything," the album burns through fourteen tracks in a mere fifteen minutes, never belaboring the point, never tripping over filler. It's as pure a manifesto of hardcore punk as you could ask for. "I Just Want Some Skank," "Beverly Hills, " "Operation," "Back Against The Wall," "Wasted," "Behind The Door," "World Up My Ass," "Paid Vacation," "Don't Care," "Live Fast Die Young," "What's Your Problem," "Group Sex," "Red Tape," this album is as iconic as the first Ramones album and beat Black Flag by a year with a debut full length. Impassioned, aggressive, tongue in cheek, and packed with anthems. It's one of the purest punk albums ever recorded.
My first exposure to the Circle Jerks came via the Alex Cox punksploitation films Repo Man ("When the Shit Hits the Fan") and Sid and Nancy ("Love Kills") (The Jerks also briefly appear in Repo Man as a lounge act). It was Morris's vocals as much as anything else that lead me to Group Sex, which at the time, came on a super saver double length CD with their second album Wild in the Streets.
As much as I loved Group Sex, I was even more into Wild in the Streets, which opens with the title track, the theme song to a 1960s youth gone wild film of the same name written by Garland Jeffreys.
"'64 Valiant, handful of valiums
Couple of beers really do me right
You better believe us, better trust us
Teenage jive, walking wreck
Wild!"
I've never heard the original and don't even want to. Its a Circle Jerks song as far as I'm concerned and I'm as happy to drive around with it blasting out of my car today as I was over twenty-five years ago. Musically, it's a better album than Group Sex, showing a lot of growth for the band in a mere year, but it contains fewer really memorable songs, but the highs ("Stars and Stripes," "Murder the Disturbed," "Letter Bomb") are really high and the lows ("Forced Labor," "Political Stu") are simply average hardcore, still highly listenable, they just stand out. At any rate, Wild in the Streets remains my favorite Circle Jerks album, but I don't think they recorded a bad album. Critics and fans weren't as kind to Wonderful or their 1995 reunion album Oddities, Abnormalities, and Curiosities, but to me they're still as worthy a spot on your shelf as Golden Shower of Hits and VI. Hell, I generally hate live albums, but I love Gig. 

Keith Morris and Greg Hetson kept Circle Jerks alive off and on into the 2000s when they finally parted ways for what seemed like for good. Along the way Morris has remained a force in music, fronting the Red Hot Chili Peppers for one gig while Anthony Kiedis was in jail and joining fellow ex-Black Flag members Bill Stevenson (Descendants/ALL), Dez Cadena (DC3/Misfits), and Chuck Dukowski (Wurm/Chuck Dukowski Sextet) with Descendants/ALL guitarist Stephen Egerton replacing Greg Ginn for an all star Black Flag live tour as FLAG. While the material was mainly the first four years covering Morris and Dez's years as the band's singers, Morris does sing the definitive Rollins era anthem "My War," and it will give you fucking chills. But more importantly than anything, is the super group hardcore outfit, OFF!, Morris formed with Steve MacDonald of Redd Kross, Dimitri Coates of Burning Brides, and Mario Rubalcala of Rocket From the Crypt. Initially releasing four four song EPs featuring cover art by Black Flag artist Raymond Pettibon, OFF! has consistently released the best punk albums of the 21st century (fight me, dude, there's a lot of good punk out there, but OFF! is the band to beat).  Hetson, left Redd Kross and did double duty in Circle Jerks and Bad Religion for years. He left Bad Religion a few years ago, but I have no idea why. Morris and Hetson were set to reunite with Zander Schloss this year to do a 40th anniversary tour, but thanks to Covid-19 that's been postponed until next year.



To get your copy of Thirsty and Miserable; A Critical Analysis of the Music of Black Flag click HERE.